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How should I approach my first repair? It's not a clean break at all, and there are large chips of wood missing.

How should I approach my first repair? It's not a clean break at all, and there are large chips of wood missing.

henrycrun8

It might look better and be stronger to make a whole new head. Cut the neck at an angle and match that angle on the new head to get a proper scarf joint. This way you don’t need to worry about filling in any missing wood and you will have fixed that other crack near the last tuner. I don’t see a truss rod, so you won’t need to worry about that when trimming the neck.


Ch1ldofSatan

This seems like a good way to do it. Start over with nice clean lines for a good glue up.


Neonorangehats

That seems a bit over my level for now, I think I’ll try with the plugs first but if it’s not good enough I can try this


Neonorangehats

Context: I found this on FB marketplace for dirt cheap for anyone who wanted to try to repair it, so I thought I may as well try. When I brought it home I realized there was a lot of wood missing from where it broke off. I was thinking to clamp it with Titebond first, then use epoxy to fill where the wood is missing. But I am worried about how much strength will be lost, I know Titebond and epoxy are really strong materials, but what about the structure of the wood?


thanksforthatphil

Twoodford on YouTube did a repair similar to this. Tack it together with super glue then use a router to plug the missing material using titebond for the splines. It personally put I peg head veneer over the front to hide the damage when it's glued together


Ok_Donut5442

Upvoting for Twoodford his Chanel has got to be one of the best ones out there and is so relaxing


thanksforthatphil

His channel is brilliant, an absolute artist whilst being incredibly humble.


Neonorangehats

So I would actually be adding extra wood to fill it in, then sanding down? (also thanks for the useful channel!)


thanksforthatphil

So once you've glued the plugs and splines in you would only be adding material that is missing but no more, it's an effective way of repairing these difficult breaks. As a rule I always try to avoid using epoxy👌


hraath

Looks like the surfaces don't mate that well because so much wood is missing. You could consider planing away the rough surfaces and making some sort of scarf joint insert.


Hollambeast

I would glue it in place and then do the router and wood plug as previously mentioned. Once that's done if there is and gaps left that need filling, you should have enough wood shavings from the routing to fill those gaps with a mix of wood shavings and glue. Then sand it flat and go from there!


ludarock

Who’s the guitar maker?


Neonorangehats

Oh, this is a cheap Beavercreek student guitar, so I don't feel too guilty if I mess up


ludarock

As a learning exercise, cool just go for it!


DaneTheDiabetic

Go get a 1/4" wood dowel and cut it down to maybe 3/4"-1" and drill both sides in matching places to the size of the dowel, add your glue, insert the dowel,, clamp the ever loving shit out of it, then fill with resin like you mentioned before after it cures.